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On This Day: June 3rd, 1944:

The Allied meteorological team and the German Luftwaffe draw drastically different conclusions regarding the weather over the English Channel and consequently, the Allies finalise their date to invade mainland France.

In June 1944, the Allies were set to launch the largest amphibious invasion in History. The enormous number of allied troops stationed in the South of England as well as air and naval power assembled on a scale never before seen, made it impossible for the allies to hide their intentions.

There was two big questions that Hitler and his Generals needed to answer. What date would the invasion happen and where would they land?

To that end, the best and brightest from the allies were working round the clock to give themselves every advantage. Deception campaigns, dummy formations, diversionary chatter and German double agents all contributed to making the Nazis uncertain of the main Allied effort.

By June 3rd, the Allies had selected their invasion date. They decided that the weather would be clear enough to invade on June 5th (It would later be postponed to the 6th, much to the frustration of the soldiers, sailors and airmen who were called to readiness only to be stood down). The Germans were so certain that the weather for the next two weeks would be stormy that many of them went on leave, including Erwin Rommel himself, one of Germany’s most brilliant and feared commanders.

This turn of events would prove incredibly fortunate for the allies. Three days later they would set sail for Normandy and begin the liberation of Europe.

Picture shown: Men of the British 22nd Independent Parachute Company, 6th Airborne Division being briefed for the invasion.


On This Day: June 3rd, 1944:

The Allied meteorological team and the German Luftwaffe draw drastically different conclusions regarding the weather over the English Channel and consequently, the Allies finalise their date to invade mainland France.

In June 1944, the Allies were set to launch the largest amphibious invasion in History. The enormous number of allied troops stationed in the South of England as well as air and naval power assembled on a scale never before seen, made it impossible for the allies to hide their intentions.

There was two big questions that Hitler and his Generals needed to answer. What date would the invasion happen and where would they land?

To that end, the best and brightest from the allies were working round the clock to give themselves every advantage. Deception campaigns, dummy formations, diversionary chatter and German double agents all contributed to making the Nazis uncertain of the main Allied effort.

By June 3rd, the Allies had selected their invasion date. They decided that the weather would be clear enough to invade on June 5th (It would later be postponed to the 6th, much to the frustration of the soldiers, sailors and airmen who were called to readiness only to be stood down). The Germans were so certain that the weather for the next two weeks would be stormy that many of them went on leave, including Erwin Rommel himself, one of Germany’s most brilliant and feared commanders.

This turn of events would prove incredibly fortunate for the allies. Three days later they would set sail for Normandy and begin the liberation of Europe.

Picture shown: Men of the British 22nd Independent Parachute Company, 6th Airborne Division being briefed for the invasion.

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