Tiger Moth G-ADPC – a very Naval affair

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luke
Tiger Moth G-ADPC is the flagship of the Vintage Flying fleet and I thought it would be fun to share a little bit of her history.

The Tiger Moth design was derived from the DH 60 de Havilland Gipsy Moth in response to Air Ministry specification 13/31 for an ab-initio training aircraft and first flew on 26 October 1931 with de Havilland Chief Test Pilot Hubert Broad at the controls. The Tiger Moth went on to enjoy a production run of over 7,000, with a total of 4,005 being built during the war specifically for the RAF.

Our Tiger was a genuine De Havilland built pre-war Tiger Moth, originally civil registered as G-ADPC from 24 September 1935 until 3 January 1941. In January 1941 it was impressed into military service as BB852.

Our Tiger Moth as BB852

Our Tiger Moth as BB852

Our Tiger Moth as G-ADPC

Our Tiger Moth as G-ADPC

As such, it served with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm as a pilot trainer until written off on the 3 November 1964. Caught by a gust of wind while landing at Roborough, Plymouth, it overturned after hitting a pill box. It was then struck off charge, sold and stored for many years. It was later rebuilt, and reverted to its original pre-war registration G-ADPC on 15 April 1992. It is seen here taken at the Woburn Moth Rally in 1996 after its rebuild in a photograph by Alan Brown. In 1998 it was damaged in a minor landing accident in Petersfield, Hampshire. Throughout the next few years it changed ownership before becoming part of the Baxterley Flying Group in Atherstone. Paul and Sarah acquired G-ADPC in 2015.

– Kindly submitted by Jason Webb, April 2016.